Cadiz, the oldest continuously-inhabited city in the Iberian Peninsula and possibly all southwestern Europe, has been a principal home port of the Spanish Navysince the accession of the Spanish Bourbons in the 18th century. It is also the site of the University of Cádiz.Despite its unique site — on a narrow spit of land surrounded by the sea — Cadiz is, in most respects, a typically Andalusian city with a wealth of attractive vistas and well-preserved historical landmarks. The older part of Cadiz, within the remnants of the city walls, is commonly referred to as the Old City (in Spanish, Casco Antiguo). It is characterized by the antiquity of its various quarters (barrios), among them El Populo, La Viña, and Santa Maria, which present a marked contrast to the newer areas of town. While the Old City's street plan consists 'of narrow winding alleys connecting large plazas, newer areas of Cádiz typically have wide avenues and more modern buildings. In addition, the city is dotted by numerous parks where exotic plants flourish, including giant trees supposedly brought to Spain by Columbus from the New World.
Narrow Curving StreetHeading To Plaza TopeteInfrared In cadizCastillo de Santa CatalinaBar On The CornerCalle San FranciscoAyuntamiento de CadizInto The MarinaParador, CadizBoats On The BayPlaya La CaletaApproaching The BridgeBright Light Over The MistLow Cloud Across The BayWhat To Buy?Cadiz PlazaReturning From The Castle